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On the development and homologies of the molar teeth of the wart-hogs (Phacochoerus) with illustrations of a system of notation for the teeth in the class Mammalia by Owen, Richard Sir

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Published by Printed by R. and J.E. Taylor in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Odontometry,
  • Swine,
  • Dentition

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Professor Owen
ContributionsRoyal College of Surgeons of England
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 481-498, [2] leaves of plates :
Number of Pages498
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25905617M

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On the Development and Homologies of the Molar Teeth of the Wart-Hogs (Phacochaerus), with Illustrations of a System of Notation for the Teeth in the Class Mammalia (January 1, ) On the Development and Succession of the Teeth in the Marsupialia (January 1, ). Full text of "Abstracts of the papers communicated to the Royal Society of London" See other formats. On the Development and Homologies of the Molar Teeth of the Wart-Hogs (Phacochaerus), with Illustrations of a System of Notation for the Teeth in the Class Mammalia Article Jan A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

This banner text can have markup.. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. The most constant teeth are the fourth premolar and the first true molar. These being known by their order and mode of development, the homologies of the remaining molars and premolars are determined by counting the molars from before backwards, e. g. ' one,' ' two,' ' three,' and the premolars from behind forwards, 'four,' 'three,' 'two,' 'one.'. Warthogs without incisors were described from the Cape of Good Hope as Phacochoerus aethiopicus and warthogs possessing incisors were first found in Senegal and later named Phacochoerus africanus. During the second half of the 18th century and the whole of the 19th century, the majority of workers recognised these two taxa as distinct. Twentieth century palaeontologists working in Africa also. The homology of insect wings is demonstrated by similarities in venation and articulation – the wings of all insects can be derived from the same basic pattern or groundplan (as explained in section ). Sometimes association with other structures of known homologies is helpful in establishing the homology of a structure of uncertain origin.